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Dose and Location Controlled Drug/Gene/Particle Delivery to Individual Cells by Nanoelectroporation

Life Sciences
Research & Design Tools
Drug Delivery
College
College of Engineering (COE)
Researchers
Lee, L James
Boukany, Pouyan
Chiou, Nan-Rong
Guan, Jingjiao
Licensing Manager
Wohlgamuth, Christopher
(614)-247-8331
wohlgamuth.5@osu.edu

TS-037370 — A novel method to introduce targeted therapy to individual cells with perfect cell viability and transfection.

Precise delivery of nucleic acids is highly valuable for in vitro biomedical research, such as drug discovery, cell-drug biology, and cancer therapy. Controlled delivery of large gene molecules has the potential for highly efficient transfection of stem cells and pluripotent stem cells. However, c…

The Need

Precise delivery of nucleic acids is highly valuable for in vitro biomedical research, such as drug discovery, cell-drug biology, and cancer therapy. Controlled delivery of large gene molecules has the potential for highly efficient transfection of stem cells and pluripotent stem cells. However, current gene delivery methods, such as viral and non-viral nanoparticles, electroportation, and gene gun therapy, randomly transfect cells, which eliminates control of the dose and location of the injected genes. There is a need for a gene therapy technique that controls dosage and location.

The Technology

Researchers at The Ohio State University, led by Dr. L. James Lee, have developed a device and nanoelectroporation process for gene, drug, and nanoparticle delivery to individual cells with precise control of dose, location, and composition. The device focuses an electric field through a nanochannel connected to two microchannels. A single cell is located at the outlet of the nanochannel in one microchannel and the therapeutic (gene, drug, or nanoparticle) is located in the other microchannel. The electric pulse porates the cell membrane and provides electrophoretic mobility of charged molecules or nanoparticles into the cell.

Commercial Applications

  • Stem Cell Transfection
  • Cancer Therapy
  • Genomics
  • Drug Discovery and Development

Benefits/Advantages

  • Controls dose and location of therapy delivery
  • Achieves perfect cell viability and transfection with less gene, drug, or nanoparticles than conventional methods