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Drug Conjugated Lipid-based Nanomaterials and Biomedical Uses

College
College of Pharmacy
Researchers
Dong, Yizhou
Zhang, Chengxiang
Zhang, Xinfu
Licensing Manager
Dahlman, Jason "Jay"
614/292-7945
dahlman.3@osu.edu

TS-042128 — The creation of a library of anti-cancer drug conjugated nanomaterials for therapeutic applications.

Therapeutic cancer treatments often result in off-target side effects to healthy cells; improving the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to cancerous cells has the potential to reduce these occurrences and enhance the utility of the chemotherapeutics. Over the last several years, messenger RNA (mRNA)-…

The Need

Therapeutic cancer treatments often result in off-target side effects to healthy cells; improving the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to cancerous cells has the potential to reduce these occurrences and enhance the utility of the chemotherapeutics. Over the last several years, messenger RNA (mRNA)-based therapeutics have been thoroughly evaluated as a potential therapeutic avenue in various fields for biomedical applications. However, the efficient delivery of mRNA remains a key challenge in mRNA-based therapy due to the instability and insufficient translatability of mRNA thereby limiting the therapeutic potential. Therefore, novel formulations of nanomaterials are needed to improve mRNA + chemotherapeutic delivery to cancerous tissues and organs.

The Technology

Researchers from The Ohio State University, led by Dr. Yizhou Dong, have created an extensive library of anti-cancer drug conjugated nanomaterials for therapeutic applications. The lipid-derived nanoparticles incorporate both chemotherapy drugs and p53 mRNA. This combinatory therapeutic has been demonstrated as efficacious in an orthotopic triple-negative breast cancer murine model.

These lipid-based nanoparticles are successful vehicles to deliver combination therapy consisting of mRNA and chemotherapy drugs to tumor sites for improved personalized medicine. Furthermore, this type of therapeutic continues to act on the cancer cells, reducing their capacity for release of suppression genes and improving chances of traditional drug effects. The creation of this extensive lipid-based nanoparticle library has the potential to greatly improve the field of cancer therapeutics. Additionally, the formulation of this technology will likely result in the creation of therapeutics in several other fields of medicine.

Commercial Applications

  • Oncology therapeutic drug treatment
  • Crossover to several fields in the treatment of disease (i.e. vaccines, autoimmune diseases)

Benefits/Advantages

  • Dual therapeutic
  • Less off-target effects to healthy cells in cancer treatment
  • Extends therapeutic efficacy by inhibiting tumor suppression genes