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Establishment of Chicken Embryonic Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line

Veterinary Medicine
College
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)
Researchers
Khatri, Mahesh
Saif, Yehia
Licensing Manager
Dahlman, Jason "Jay"
614/292-7945
dahlman.3@osu.edu

TS-036644 — Chicken embryonic intestinal epithelial cell line used for replicating viruses and producing live and killed vaccines. The market includes avian, swine, and human influenza virus replication.

Cell lines that offer the poultry industry a method of producing vaccines are a useful way to produce treatments quickly and cost-effectively. Further, they are useful for virus replication cycle studies, bacterial adhesion studies, host-pathogen interaction studies, and cell-cell interaction stud…

The Need

Cell lines that offer the poultry industry a method of producing vaccines are a useful way to produce treatments quickly and cost-effectively. Further, they are useful for virus replication cycle studies, bacterial adhesion studies, host-pathogen interaction studies, and cell-cell interaction studies. The market for vaccines is growing, and cell lines that can support replication of multiple influenza viruses are in high demand.

The Technology

Researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a line of spontaneously immortalized chicken embryonic intestinal epithelial cells for virus replication and production of live and killed vaccines. These cells are fast growing, express the cytokeratin marker, and support the replication of avian, swine, and human influenza viruses. The cells can replicate indefinitely and be held in a viable state in liquid nitrogen. This cell line is likely to offer a valuable alternative to live embryonated eggs or primary cell cultures in vaccine production.

Commercial Applications

  • Vaccines
  • Research

Benefits/ Advantages

  • Well-established
  • Replicates indefinitely
  • Can be held in a viable state in liquid nitrogen
  • Suitable as a vector for replicating viruses