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Immortalized Duck Embryonic Intestinal Epithelial Cell line (MK-DIEC)

Life Sciences
Research & Design Tools
Cell Lines
Vaccines
College
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)
Researchers
Khatri, Mahesh
Licensing Manager
Dahlman, Jason "Jay"
614/292-7945
dahlman.3@osu.edu

TS-036842 — An immortalized duck embryonic intestinal epithelial cell line (MK-DIEC) for producing live and killed vaccines

Currently most vaccine production is done through live embryonic eggs or primary cell cultures, allowing researchers to replicate pathogen function. Although existing vaccines for influenza and animal intestinal diseases such as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) exist and are considered effec…

The Need

Currently most vaccine production is done through live embryonic eggs or primary cell cultures, allowing researchers to replicate pathogen function. Although existing vaccines for influenza and animal intestinal diseases such as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) exist and are considered effective, the vaccines do not induce solid lactogenic immunity for many treated animals. Therefore, the need exists for a method to culture intestinal pathogens to enhance vaccine research and development.

The Technology

Researchers at The Ohio State University, led by Dr. Mahesh Khatri, have developed a spontaneously immortalized epithelial cell line using embryonic duck intestinal tissue, in order to bolster research efforts around viruses such as influenza and PEDV. The cells, being cuboidal in shape, are able to grow rapidly in culture, while expressing receptors for avian and mammalian influenza viruses. By supporting the replication of PEDV, as well as bird, swine and human influenza, the proposed cell line offers value for researchers looking to develop high titered, live attenuated and killed viral vaccines. These cells may be used to study virus replication cycles, host-pathogen interaction, and drug testing.

Commercial Applications

  • Vaccines
  • Research

Benefits/ Advantages

  • Reduced costs
  • Reduced time
  • Avoids the problem of a lack of a regular supply of high-quality eggs and the presence of adventitious agents in eggs
  • Unlike chickens, the duck genome does not contain endogenous retroviruses