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Lipid Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Delivery of Anti-miRs and miRs

Healthcare Portfolios
Life Sciences
Materials
Drug Delivery
Nanomaterials
Oncology
Therapeutics
College
College of Pharmacy
Researchers
Lee, Robert
Licensing Manager
Flammang, Ann Marie
614-292-9839
flammang.2@osu.edu

TS-037707 — An efficient delivery vehicle for therapeutic oligonucleotides with high efficiency.

MiRNA or miRs are small non-protein coding RNA which are capable of regulating mRNAs in multiple biological pathways, including those involved in cancer development and wound healing. Antagomirs, also known as anti-miRs, inhibit miR activity and could be used to develop therapeutics for interventi…

The Need

MiRNA or miRs are small non-protein coding RNA which are capable of regulating mRNAs in multiple biological pathways, including those involved in cancer development and wound healing. Antagomirs, also known as anti-miRs, inhibit miR activity and could be used to develop therapeutics for intervention in diseases. However, the clinical translation of nucleic acid based therapies face several obstacles in their implementation due to challenges in transporting nucleic acids to their intracellular target, relative instability in vivo, and degradation by serum and cellular nucleases. The high negative charges of nucleic acids make it difficult to stimulate diffusion across cell membranes. Improved in vivo delivery vehicles for antimiRs and miRs are needed for therapeutic applications.

The Technology

Researchers at The Ohio State University led by Dr. Robert Lee have developed novel compositions of lipid nanoparticles (LNP) that encapsulate therapeutic oligonucleotides and exhibit a high encapsulation efficiency. The particles are shelf-stable 4-25°C. The method for creating these LNPs has been refined by the researchers. The new method results in greater transfection efficiency and ideal particle sizes for post-production sterilization.

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In vivo studies using a rodent tumor model resulted in a significant decrease in tumor size when animals were treated with an injection of the loaded LNP. In addition to using these nanoparticles to deliver tumor inhibition compounds, the LNP can also be loaded with miR and delivered to wound sites to improve healing. These novel lipid nanoparticles represent a new avenue for controlled delivery of anti-miRs and miR for therapeutic applications.

Commercial Applications

  • Wound healing
  • Oncology pharmaceutical development
  • Targeted cancer treatment

Benefits/Advantages

  • Efficient delivery of miRNA and anti-miRNA particles
  • Improved wound healing through targeted composition delivery
  • Reduction in tumor size without detrimental side-effects such as weight loss or organ damage