The Ohio State University Corporate Engagement Office

Back to All Technologies

miRNA detection system and method

Healthcare Portfolios
Life Sciences
Research & Design Tools
Screening Assays
College
College of Pharmacy
Researchers
Guo, Peixuan
Vieweger, Mario
Yin, Hongran
Licensing Manager
Flammang, Ann Marie
614-292-9839
flammang.2@osu.edu

TS-046585 — A system for detecting the presence of a target single stranded nucleic acid, such as miRNA, in a fluid sample. The system can be used to target RNA for a variety of different purposes that include diagnostic biomarkers and biomedical research. The expanding uses of RNA make this technology viable for a large number of fields and applications with the potential for the diagnosis of a variety of diseases using bodily fluid samples such as urine, saliva, milk, and blood.

RNA is emerging as a potential component in a plethora of fields. As evidence has been compiled, it is now recognized that RNA plays a major role in human genetics, and is projected to be a major milestone in future drug development. Unfortunately, routine methods of miRNAs, including qPCR and mic…

The Need

RNA is emerging as a potential component in a plethora of fields. As evidence has been compiled, it is now recognized that RNA plays a major role in human genetics, and is projected to be a major milestone in future drug development. Unfortunately, routine methods of miRNAs, including qPCR and microarrays, are expensive, labor intensive, and unavailable in a typical doctor’s office. Therefore, as RNA continues to emerge in various scientific fields of study, a system to reliably and efficiently detect target RNA is needed.

The Technology

Dr. Guo and colleagues have developed a novel method and system of detecting RNA. Their system includes two LNA probes and a membrane for complex migration. Essentially, the assay consists of a marker LNA for miRNA detection and a second immobilized LNA complex for anchoring to a solid support. The RNA sample is incubated with the marker LNA so that the detection marker binds to the miRNAs, then the sample is spotted onto one end of the membrane support (the solid support) and the solvent reservoir is filled. Capillary forces pull the solvent and the miRNA/marker complex over the immobilization LNA complex; the miRNA/marker binds to it and produces a color or fluorescence. The other sample components continue to move passed the control line. The visible color or fluorescence of the miRNA/marker complex can then be used for quantitative and qualitative detection of the miRNA.

This technology provides for inexpensive, simple, and reliable miRNA detection. As research and use of RNA continues to expand, the need for such a device will continue to grow exponentially. Current methods of RNA analysis such as qPCR, microarrays, and throughput sequencing are expensive, labor intensive, and rarely available in a typical doctor’s office. This technology therefore represents a drastic improvement over these other methods of RNA targeting as a consequence of its simplicity and affordability.

Commercial Applications

  • RNA research
  • Therapeutic Development
  • Medical Diagnoses

Benefits/Advantages

  • Inexpensive
  • Simple to use