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A new upward airflow displacement ventilation (UADV) system of Manure-Belt Layer Houses

College
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)
Researchers
Zhao, Lingying
Hong, Se-Woon
Tong, Xinjie
Licensing Manager
Dahlman, Jason "Jay"
614/292-7945
dahlman.3@osu.edu

TS-038466 — Better design of ventilation in layer houses yields improved results for heat dispersion and spread of pathogens.

Heat stress and disease outbreak have resulted in significant losses in large-scale egg productions. Heat stress has caused an annual economic loss of $98 million with no abatement and $61 million with the current optimum abatement in U.S. egg production from a combination of decreased egg product…

The Need

Heat stress and disease outbreak have resulted in significant losses in large-scale egg productions. Heat stress has caused an annual economic loss of $98 million with no abatement and $61 million with the current optimum abatement in U.S. egg production from a combination of decreased egg production, reduced egg quality, and hen mortality. It has been a major challenge to achieve an optimum and safe indoor environment in layer houses with the current ventilation environmental control systems. Global warming has also lead to weather extremes that worsen the heat stress problem. Disease outbreak is another large threat to the poultry industry; in 2014 avian flu infected 57 million birds in the U.S. Poultry house ventilation was a suspect for its rapid spread, as the air passes by many birds on its jouney through the house. New ventilation systems providing safe, optimum, and uniform indoor environment are needed for largescale layer hen production facilities,

The Technology

Researchers at The Ohio State University, led by Drs. Lingying Zhao, Sewoon Hong, and Xinjie Tong have developed a new upward airflow displacement ventilation (UADV) system which allows fresh air to enter a layer house through air ducts at the bottom of the cages, move upward by thermal buoyancy and pressure differences from exhaust fans, and exit the house through exhaust fans on the roof. This system was evaluated in comparison to a typical tunnel ventilation system in simulations for air exchange efficiency, thermal environment, and spread of pathogens in summer and in winter. Pairing this new system with a geothermal temperature control system yields even better results.

Commercial Applications

  • Poultry farms
  • Potential application to other farms

Benefits/Advantages

  • More effective ventilation
  • Uniform thermal environment
  • Better disease control