The Ohio State University Corporate Engagement Office

Back to All Technologies

Novel Antimicrobials to Control Campylobacter

Agriculture
Food Science
Food Safety
College
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)
Researchers
Rajashekara, Gireesh
Acuna, Ulyana Munoz
Antwi, Janet
Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza
Fuchs, James
Kumar, Anand
Nislow, Corey
Pascall, Melvin
Licensing Manager
Dahlman, Jason "Jay"
614/292-7945
dahlman.3@osu.edu

TS-034486 — Twelve novel small molecule compounds that are bactericidal to control diverse strains of Campylobacter without adversely affecting the host or inducing resistance in bacteria. Resultant compounds can be used to develop effective treatments for Campolybacter infections in human and veterinary medicine.

Campylobacter is the global leading cause of foodborne diarrheal disease in humans, and has also been associated with fatal conditions such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome, and functional bowel diseases. Moreover, this decade it is projected to remain one of the top ten i…

The Need

Campylobacter is the global leading cause of foodborne diarrheal disease in humans, and has also been associated with fatal conditions such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome, and functional bowel diseases. Moreover, this decade it is projected to remain one of the top ten isolated bacterial illnesses worldwide. Human infection primarily occurs by ingesting contaminated chicken, and treatment requires antimicrobial therapy. However, as antimicrobial usage for therapeutics and prophylactics has increased, many new strains of Campylobacter are emerging that are resistant to the currently available antimicrobials. Consequently, a new generation of antimicrobials that can be used in humans and livestock production systems is vital.

The Technology

Researchers at The Ohio State University, led by Dr. Gireesh Rajasherkera, have discovered twelve novel compounds that provide a chemical scaffold for the development of Campylobacter-specific drugs that can be applied in both human and veterinary medicines. The molecules belong to five established antimicrobial chemical classes - piperazines, aryl amines, piperidines, sulfonamides, and pyridazinones - and their potency and specificity were established using various assays. These compounds have the potential to surpass the currently available antimicrobials.

Commercial Applications

  • Medicine/ Pharmaceuticals
  • Agriculture
  • Veterinary Medicine/ Pharmaceuticals
  • Food Science and Nutrition
    • Food Safety

Benefits/ Advantages

  • Small size allows diffusion into target cells.
  • Stability and suitability for mass production
    • Could be a prerequisite in commercial poultry operations
  • Less likely to lead to resistant bacteria than conventional antibiotics because of their mode of action
  • Can be applied in combination with other antimicrobials to overcome resistance and improve efficacy of their use
  • Can be easily utilized at pre- and/or post-harvest stages
  • Can be developed as a drug for Camplobacteriosis treatment in humans