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Oncolytic Virus Limiting Tumor Progression And Improving Viral Replication

Healthcare Portfolios
Life Sciences
Oncology
Therapeutics
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals
College
College of Medicine (COM)
Researchers
Kaur, Balveen
Licensing Manager
Davis, Stewart
6142927170
Davis.6014@osu.edu

T2016-238 An engineered oncolytic virus sequestering the ligand for receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signaling, resulting in improved viral replication and reduction of tumor progression.

The Need

The multi ligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) of the immunoglobulin superfamily is expressed on multiple cell types that are part of the immune-inflammatory response. These receptors propagate cellular dysfunction in several disorders such as in tumors and diabetes. RAGE is expressed at low levels in normal tissues but is expressed more in endothelial cells after inflammation or injury, as well as on T and B cells. RAGE activation is cancer supportive, involved in proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. As a result, there is a need for a mechanism to block RAGE signaling to increase viral replication and decrease cancer cell proliferation.

The Technology

Upon infection with an oncolytic virus, cancer cells may produce RAGE ligand. RAGE ligand binds to receptors on endothelial cells, leading to tumor proliferation and decreased oncolytic virus replication. Researchers at The Ohio State University have a provisional patent for an engineered oncolytic virus encoding a protein that blocks RAGE signaling by sequestering the RAGE ligand. This results in decreased tumor progression and increased oncolytic virus replication.

Patent Status

National phase patent applications have been filed in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Europe, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and United States.

Commercial Applications

  • Cancer treatment
  • Oncolytic viruses
  • Research

Benefits/Advantages

  • Inhibits endothelial cell activation and increases viral replication
  • Reduces tumor progression