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Swine liver stem/progenitor cell line

Agriculture
Research & Design Tools
Veterinary Medicine
College
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES)
Researchers
Khatri, Mahesh
Saif, Yehia
Licensing Manager
Dahlman, Jason "Jay"
614/292-7945
dahlman.3@osu.edu

TS-036771 — A spontaneously immortalized swine liver stem/progenitor cell line developed from normal White-Duroc crossbred pigs.

World-wide vaccine production is a multi-billion dollar industry. Currently, most vaccines are produced in live embryonated eggs or primary cell cultures. Vaccine production from eggs has been around for over half a century and can be costly and slow. Swine vaccine production from cell lines is of…

The Need

World-wide vaccine production is a multi-billion dollar industry. Currently, most vaccines are produced in live embryonated eggs or primary cell cultures. Vaccine production from eggs has been around for over half a century and can be costly and slow. Swine vaccine production from cell lines is of great interest as an alternative to standard methods of vaccination and is important in health management for modern pig production.

The Technology

A spontaneously immortalized swine liver stem/progenitor cell line was developed from liver tissue of a normal 5-week-old White-Duroc crossbred specific pathogen free pig. This cell line is well established, replicates indefinitely and can be held in a viable state in liquid nitrogen. The cells exhibit epithelial cell-like morphology and express stem cell markers octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct4) and stage-specific embryonic antigen-l (SSEA-l). This cell line should be a very suitable vector for replicating viruses and producing live and killed vaccines. In addition, these cells may be used in virus replication cycle, tissue regeneration and in vitro pharmacotoxiocological testing.

Commercial Applications

  • Agriculture
  • Veterinary Medicine
  • Vaccines

Benefits/ Advantages

  • Well-established
  • Can be held in a viable state in liquid nitrogen
  • Replicates indefinitely
  • Potential for more efficient vaccine production