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Time Management Facilitator

Medical Devices
Equipment
Rehabilitation / Assistive Devices
Research Equipment
College
College of Engineering (COE)
Researchers
Rogers, Peter "Peter"
Alley, Krista
Cornelius, Kristen
Dew, Elise
Hegedus, Alexander
Johnson, Kyle
Shiroma, Cecilia
Weisbecker, Carolyn
Whitehouse, Katherine
Licensing Manager
Aanstoos, Megan
614-292-4946
aanstoos.1@osu.edu

T2010-170 A novel device to reinforce the abstract concept of time to intellectually disabled children, especially those with Down syndrome.

The Need

Learning and understanding the abstract and intangible concept of time is especially difficult for children with Down Syndrome. This difficulty can cause deep frustration because it affects the family’s daily routine and reduces the child’s independence in the home, at school, and eventually in the workplace. Few devices on the market address the specific requirements of young children with Down Syndrome. There is a need to develop a device that meets the requirements of young children with Down Syndrome and the needs of the families.

The Technology

Inventors at The Ohio State University, led by Dr. Peter Rogers, have developed an electromechanical device that helps children with Down Syndrome understand the concept of time. The hand-held, portable device provides a visual sequence of events and a proportional amount of time in a specific way that directly addresses the cognitive and physical disabilities of children with Down Syndrome. The time device linearly portrays several tasks in logical order, and provides a visual indicator showing the passage of time and the time remaining for a certain task.

Commercial Applications

  • Individualized Family Services Therapy
  • Mental Health Rehabilitation
  • Early Childhood Education

Benefits/Advantages

  • Robust, portable, and has visual appeal directed to children
  • Operation is simple and requires minimal set up time
  • Employs interactive features and an optional audible reinforcement for completion of tasks to provide the child a sense of accomplishment